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Research & Investigations in Sports Medicine

Intimate Partner Violence: Is it Possible to Evaluate on Similar Way to Men and Women?

  • Open or Close Yessica Ivet Cienfuegos Martínez*

    Department of Psychology, Universidad de Guanajuato, Mexico

    *Corresponding author:Yessica Ivet Cienfuegos Martínez, Department of Psychology, Universidad de Guanajuato, Blvd Puente Milenio #1001 Fracción del Predio San Carlos CP 37670, León, Guanajuato, Mexico

Submission: July 28, 2018;Published: August 06, 2018

DOI: 10.31031/RISM.2018.03.000569

ISSN: 2577-1914
Volume3 Issue4

Abstract

Intimate Partner Violence [IPV] is a complex and multi-determinate phenomenon, there are different theoretical approximations to explain it; some of them are related to internal factors as self-esteem, attachment, or intergenerational transmission of violence, others are focused on external elements. Ecological Model is an alternative in which is possible to consider both, internal and external factors, altogether. On IPV, men and women can become victims and perpetrators; however, per Ecological Model, these facts need different background for their explanation. To be born as a man or as a woman in a patriarchal world poses different challenges and opportunities for each. To Blazquez [1], gender as a key organizeras race, ethnicity or class. Madson et al. [2] to talk about gender socialization point that male and female are in two different subcultures. In general, both, men and women learned to understand the socio-structural context and the internal world in different way. Often, women are socialized to be for others, they bodies are sexualized from early age, they are teaching to no “provoke” an aggression, to be careful about males; males, by other hand, are usually socialized to be proactive, aggressive; men are considered sexual subjects, not sexual objects as women. These lines are about the importance to incorporate gender perspective analysis to the employ similar measurement scales to evaluate IPV on men and women.

Keywords:Intimate partner violence; Men; Women; Evaluation; Gender perspective

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