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Modern Concepts & Developments in Agronomy

Evaluation of Soya Bean Varieties at Moisture Stress of Eastern Harerghe Zone

Habte Berhanu* and Adugna Hunduma Dabalo

Fedis Agricultural Research Center

*Corresponding author: Habte Berhanu, Fedis Agricultural Research Center, Ethiopia

Submission: June 19, 2018;Published: August 23, 2018

DOI: 10.31031/MCDA.2018.03.000559

ISSN 2637-7659
Volume3 Issue2

Abstract

Soya bean is a multi-purpose crop. The area of production for soybeans is expected to increase due raised demand of domestic processing industries and boosted demand for use in animal feed. This experiment were conducted with the objective of identify superior genotypes in terms of yield, insect pest & disease tolerance/resistance and with desirable agronomic traits for the last two years of (2014 & 2015). Analysis of variance showed that there were significant difference among the varieties in terms of disease reaction, grain yield and yield related attributes. Korme, Ethio-eugoslavia and Didesa provided about 32.67%, 29.11%, 22.55%, yield advantages over the standard check (Clark), respectively. Therefore, the three high yielding varieties (Korme, Ethio-eugoslavia, and Didesa) were selected and recommended for further production at Fedis and similar agro-ecologies.

Keywords: Variety; Adaptability; Yield advantages

Introduction

Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most valuable crops in the world, due to its multiple uses as a source of livestock and aquaculture feed, protein and oil for the human diet and biofuel besides producing valuable grain, soybean fixes between 44 and 300kgNha-1 which makes a significant N contribution to intercropped and rotated cereal crops. For example, Peoples and Craswell 1992 estimated the improvement of maize crop following soybean crop at between 0.5 and 3.5tons ha-1 or 30-350% relative to maize-maize sequences.

The yields of soybean in most parts of Africa can increase from 0.5 to 2.5tons ha-1 if the recommended steps are followed during their production. In most cases when soybean yields exceed 1.2ton ha-1, farmers are likely to make profits but at less than 0.7tons/ ha farmers may not be able to recoup the cost of production. As soybean market value is good, application of little fertilizer like 20kgPha-1, starter nitrogen and inoculant is often profitable even with conservative yield increment of 0.5tons ha-1. Important measures for boosting soybean yields include; adoption of high yielding seed varieties, soil fertility management, pest/disease control, observing the most appropriate planting time. This section reviews existing knowledge on some of the best management practices for soybean.

Soya bean is a multi-purpose crop. The area of production for soybeans is expected to increase due raised demand of domestic processing industries and boosted demand for use in animal feed. Ethiopia is strategically located closer to the world’s largest consumers EIAR 2011. The reasons for low productivity of this crop are due to various reasons but the major reason is lack of high yielding improved varieties. To improve such low productivity, specially; in eastern Harerghe adaptation of high yielding varieties with proper plant architecture and duration was effectively done and it has paramount importance. For this purpose, the seven varieties with suitable plant types were selected from Bako Agricultural Research Center and adapted. This experiment was conducted with the objective of identify superior genotypes in terms of yield, insect pest & disease tolerance/resistance and with desirable agronomic traits for the last two years 2014 & 2015.

Materials and Methods

The study was conducted at mid-altitude of Eastern Harerghe Fadis on station. Six improved soybean varieties (dhidhessa, ketta, korme, ethio-ugislavia, hawasa04 and awasa95) were collected from Bako Agricultural Research Center. Standard check (clark) were used to compare with those improved varieties. Recommended spacing was used with plot size of 3mx4m. Seed rate of 134kg/ha were used for each variety depending on the seed size [1-14].

Results and Discussion

With the objective of evaluating the performance ability/ adaptability/ of the soybean varieties in terms of yield, and yield related traits, the trial was undertaken on 3m*4m for last two years on one location (Fadis). So far, data on disease and insect pest incidence, days to maturity, number of pods per plant, seed of seeds per pod, number of seeds per plant were taken. All data were collected and analyzed by using the Gen STAT software. Analysis of ANOVA showed that there were significant difference among the varieties in terms of disease reaction, grain yield and yield related attributes. The table ANOVA shows the pooled mean yield of soybean varieties at one location and years 2014 & 2015 in adaptation trial was significant (5%) difference. It was clearly indicated that korme, ethio-eugoslavia and Didesa were superior to the standard check and selected for further production and promotion program. Awasa 04 was very sensitive to diseases reaction (Table 1).

Table 1:


Note: NB: MD: Maturity Date; Ppp: Pod per Plant; Spp: Seeds per Pod; Yield (kg/ha): grain yield in kilogram per hectare; NS: Not Significant

Recommendation

The analysis of variance showed that significant differences for grain yield among evaluated varieties. Korme, Ethio-eugoslavia and Didesa provided about 32.67%, 29.11%, 22.55%, yield advantages over the standard check (Clark), respectively. Therefore, the three high yielding varieties (Korme, Ethio-eugoslavia, and Didesa) were selected and recommended for further production at Fedis and similar agro-ecologies.

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© 2018 Habte Berhanu. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and build upon your work non-commercially.



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