Abstract

Research & Investigations in Sports Medicine

Changes in Body Position during a 2-Minute Push-Up Test

  • Open or Close Jennifer K Hewit*, Daniel A Jaffe and Alex J Bedard

    Department of Physical Education, United States Military Academy at West Point, USA

    *Corresponding author: Jennifer K. Hewit, Ph.D, Assistant Professor, Department of Physical Education Director of the Human Performance Lab, United States Military Academy at West Point, USA, Tel: 845-938-8085; Email: jennifer.hewit@usma.edu

Submission: November 22, 2017; Published: December 19, 2017

DOI: 10.31031/RISM.2017.01.000516

ISSN: 2577-1914
Volume1 Issue4

Abstract

Push-ups are a common exercise for individuals of all ages and abilities. Ensuring that the body maintains optimal positioning is crucial throughout any activity. This brief study investigates the changes in hand height and torso angle throughout a 2-minute push-up test. A total of 26 males (23.3±6.9 years old) participated in this study. Video was collected of the entire 2-minute push-up bout. Of interest to the researchers was the distance the hand was in relation to the shoulder and the angle of the torso to the horizontal (both measure from participants’ sagittal view). Three consecutive repetitions at the start and end of the bout were used for comparative analysis. Both hand placement in relation to the shoulder and torso angle decreased significantly (p=0.00) from the start of the bout to the end. These results indicate that as participants became tired, they assumed a body position that likely allowed for a greater portion of their body weight to be supported by their lower body. While this adjustment allowed them to continue the exercise, compensational patterns like this should be identified and addressed in training in order to strengthen the primary muscles targeted by the exercise.

Keywords: Hand height; Torso angle; Form; Technique; Assessment; Muscular endurance; Body angles; Hand position

Abbreviations: Hand Ht: Hand Height in relation to the shoulder; Torso: Torso angle to the horizontal

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